Being novices in the blog department, we will get to adding our Coolvac Facebook page to the site but in the meantime the following comments are an accumulation of 40 years in the industry. Hopefully passing on these comments will assist all kinds of refrigeration engineers irrespective of their experience to borrow from our time spent in the refrigeration industry. In time we hope to make the following a little more user friendly with access to our resources on whatever particular subjects you require.

The start of our blog relates to the importance of leak testing. Have a look at the Knowledgebank leak testing page for further information on the subject which is also reprinted below. I started my relationship with the refrigeration industry in the 60’s having spent my apprenticeship years in the New Zealand Auckland based Navy Dockyards which covered all aspects of engineering through various workshop departments (as a civilian. not actually being in the Navy) including the “Refrigeration Shop”. I then travelled to England working for a distributor of refrigeration and freezer equipment as a serviceman covering all of England & Wales until the mid 70’s.

While this gave me plenty of experience in general refrigeration & airconditioning, it was not until my later involvement with freeze drying back in the South Pacific at the beginning of the 80’s that my relationship with “Vacuum” started to make sense. This has led to my lifelong involvement in the vacuum industry with a mixture of refrigeration and vacuum skills creating the passion I have today for leak detection and the importance of containing refrigerant in all its methods and formats. While at first glance, the refrigeration industry may not appear to have much relevance to the vacuum industry (with the exeption of removing air from pipework), understanding vacuum related leak detection and the behaviour of water in a vacuum are both critical to the efficiency and skills of a successful refrigeration serviceman.

Recently we attended a climate conference in Apia Samoa (November 2013) and it was very pleasing to see just how important this subject was treated by both our own presentation and those of others.